The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a breed of dog that originated in the United States and is known for its strong hunting instincts, loyalty, and intelligence. The breed is a descendant of the English Foxhound and was developed in the mid-19th century by crossing several different breeds, including the Walker Hound, the Tennessee Lead Hound, and the English Foxhound. Today, the Treeing Walker Coonhound is recognized by the American Kennel Club and is a popular hunting and companion dog in the United States and around the world.

If you're considering getting a Treeing Walker Coonhound or are simply interested in learning more about this fascinating breed, you've come to the right place! In this article, we'll provide a comprehensive overview of the Treeing Walker Coonhound, including its history, characteristics, and care needs. So, let's dive in!

History of the Treeing Walker Coonhound

Origins and development of the breed

The Treeing Walker Coonhound breed originated in the United States in the mid-19th century. The breed was developed by crossing several different breeds, including the Walker Hound, the Tennessee Lead Hound, and the English Foxhound. The Walker Hound was known for its exceptional scenting ability and endurance, while the Tennessee Lead Hound was renowned for its speed and agility. The English Foxhound was added to the mix to improve the breed's hunting instincts and to create a more versatile hunting dog that could track and tree a variety of game, including raccoons, squirrels, and possums.

The name "Treeing" comes from the breed's ability to chase game up into trees and keep them treed until the hunter arrived. The Treeing Walker Coonhound was originally used as a hunting dog and was highly valued for its exceptional tracking ability and stamina. The breed quickly gained popularity among hunters in the southern United States and was recognized as a distinct breed by the United Kennel Club in 1945.

In the 20th century, the Treeing Walker Coonhound became increasingly popular as a companion dog and family pet. The breed's friendly and affectionate nature, as well as its intelligence and trainability, made it a favorite among dog owners of all ages. Today, the Treeing Walker Coonhound is recognized by the American Kennel Club and is a popular breed for hunting, agility, and obedience competitions, as well as for therapy work and as a family companion.

Role of the Treeing Walker Coonhound in hunting

The Treeing Walker Coonhound was bred to be a hunting dog, specifically for tracking and treeing small game, such as raccoons, squirrels, and possums. The breed's exceptional sense of smell, stamina, and agility made it an ideal hunting companion for hunters in the southern United States.

In hunting, the Treeing Walker Coonhound would typically track the scent of its prey and chase it up into a tree. Once the game was treed, the hunter would arrive on the scene and either shoot the animal or retrieve it with the help of the dog. The Treeing Walker Coonhound was especially prized for its ability to locate and tree game in difficult terrain and under adverse weather conditions.

Exploring the Treeing Walker Coonhound

Over the years, several famous Treeing Walker Coonhounds have made their mark in hunting and American culture. One of the most well-known Treeing Walker Coonhounds was a dog named "Tennessee Lead," who was known for his exceptional speed and agility. Tennessee Lead was so highly regarded that he was immortalized in a statue in Winchester, Tennessee.

Another famous Treeing Walker Coonhound was "Midnight Sun," who was a champion hunting dog in the 1950s and 1960s. Midnight Sun was known for his ability to track and tree game under even the most challenging conditions and was a favorite among hunters in the southern United States.

In addition to their hunting prowess, Treeing Walker Coonhounds have also made their mark in popular culture. For example, the famous comic strip character "Blue" from the "Red and Rover" comic strip is a Treeing Walker Coonhound, and the breed has been featured in several movies and television shows over the years.

Characteristics of the Treeing Walker Coonhound

Physical appearance and size

Characteristics of the Treeing Walker Coonhound

The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a medium to large-sized breed of dog with a sleek, athletic build. Here are some specific details about their physical appearance:

  1. Height: Male Treeing Walker Coonhounds stand 22-27 inches (56-69 cm) tall at the shoulder, while females are slightly smaller, standing 20-25 inches (51-64 cm) tall.
  2. Weight: The average weight for a male Treeing Walker Coonhound is 50-70 pounds (23-32 kg), and for a female, it is 40-60 pounds (18-27 kg).
  3. Coat: The breed's coat is short, dense, and glossy. It is typically tricolored, with a black saddle or blanket on the back and white markings on the legs, chest, and face. The third color is usually tan or brown, and it can appear on the dog's head, ears, and legs.
  4. Head: The Treeing Walker Coonhound has a long, narrow head with a slightly domed skull. Their ears are set high on the head and are long and droopy. The breed has a strong, straight muzzle and a black nose.
  5. Eyes: The breed's eyes are medium-sized, dark brown, and have a friendly and alert expression.
  6. Body: The Treeing Walker Coonhound has a muscular and athletic body, with a deep chest and strong, straight legs. The breed has a slightly curved tail that is carried high when the dog is alert or excited.
  7. Gait: The Treeing Walker Coonhound has a smooth and effortless gait, with good reach and drive. They are built for speed and endurance, making them excellent hunters.

Temperament and personality traits

The Treeing Walker Coonhound is known for its friendly and affectionate personality, as well as its high energy level and intelligence. The breed is highly social and enjoys spending time with its human family, but also has a strong independent streak and can be quite stubborn at times. Here are some of the key personality traits that are commonly associated with the Treeing Walker Coonhound:

  1. Friendly: The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a highly social breed that loves spending time with people. They are known for their outgoing personalities and are generally very friendly with strangers, making them poor guard dogs.
  2. Loyal: The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a fiercely loyal breed that forms strong bonds with its human family. They are highly devoted to their owners and will go to great lengths to protect them if necessary.
  3. Energetic: The Treeing Walker Coonhound has a high energy level and requires plenty of exercise to stay healthy and happy. They are not well-suited to apartment living and need plenty of space to run and play.
  4. Intelligent: The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a highly intelligent breed that is eager to please its owners. They are quick learners and respond well to positive reinforcement training methods.
  5. Independent: While the Treeing Walker Coonhound is highly social, they also have a strong independent streak and can be quite stubborn at times. This can make training a challenge, but with patience and consistency, they can be trained to follow commands reliably.
  6. Vocal: The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a vocal breed that is known for its distinctive "bay" or "bawl" when on the hunt. They are not well-suited to urban living or to homes with noise-sensitive neighbors.
  7. Affectionate: The Treeing Walker Coonhound loves to be around people and is known for its affectionate nature. They enjoy cuddling with their owners and will often seek out attention and affection.

Exercise and activity requirements

It's important to note that the Treeing Walker Coonhound is not well-suited to apartment living or to homes with limited outdoor space. They need plenty of room to run and play and may become destructive or develop behavioral problems if they do not get enough exercise and mental stimulation.

treeing walker coonhounds

Here are some of the key exercise and activity requirements of the Treeing Walker Coonhound:

  1. Daily exercise: The Treeing Walker Coonhound needs at least 60-90 minutes of exercise each day. This can include walks, runs, hikes, or other forms of physical activity.
  2. Off-leash time: Because of their high energy level and love of exploring, the Treeing Walker Coonhound needs plenty of off-leash time in a safe and secure area. A fenced yard or dog park is ideal.
  3. Mental stimulation: In addition to physical exercise, the Treeing Walker Coonhound also needs plenty of mental stimulation to keep their minds engaged. This can include puzzle toys, obedience training, or other activities that challenge their intellect.
  4. Hunting or tracking activities: Because of their strong hunting instinct, the Treeing Walker Coonhound may enjoy activities such as tracking, lure coursing, or other dog sports.
  5. Training and socialization: In order to channel their energy in a positive direction, the Treeing Walker Coonhound also needs plenty of training and socialization. This can help them learn to follow commands and interact appropriately with other people and dogs.

Common health issues and how to prevent them

treeing walker coonhounds

Like all dog breeds, the Treeing Walker Coonhound is susceptible to certain health issues. Here are some of the most common health problems that affect this breed, as well as steps that owners can take to prevent them:

  1. Ear Infections: Because of their floppy ears and love of water, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are prone to ear infections. To prevent ear infections, owners should clean their dog's ears regularly, and ensure that they dry thoroughly after swimming or bathing.
  2. Obesity: Like many breeds, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are prone to obesity if they do not get enough exercise and are overfed. To prevent obesity, owners should ensure that their dog gets plenty of exercise and feed them a balanced diet in appropriate portions.
  3. Hypothyroidism: This is a condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones, leading to weight gain, lethargy, and other symptoms. To prevent hypothyroidism, owners should ensure that their dog receives regular veterinary checkups and blood tests.
  4. Bloat: Also known as gastric torsion, this is a life-threatening condition in which the stomach twists, cutting off blood flow and causing tissue damage. To prevent bloat, owners should avoid feeding their dog one large meal per day and instead feed them smaller, more frequent meals.

Fun Facts about Treeing Walker Coonhounds

  • Treeing Walker Coonhounds are known for their distinctive bay, which can be heard from a great distance.
  • They are highly energetic and require plenty of exercises, but they also have a laid-back personality and are known for being good with children.
  • Treeing Walker Coonhounds are often described as being "velcro dogs" because they love to be close to their owners and follow them around everywhere.
  • The breed has a strong prey drive and should always be kept on a leash or in a secure, fenced area when outside.
  • Despite their hunting instincts, Treeing Walker Coonhounds are known for being gentle and affectionate with their families.
  • They are also known for their intelligence and trainability, although they can be stubborn at times.

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